I am stylin’ | A Case Study on Content Marketing

Filed in Internet, Marketing, Multimedia by on June 21, 2011 3 Comments
[ismember]

Sure you have a social media platform, but what are you and your fans going to talk about and how will it generate sales?

By now, most businesses have built a basic social media platform – a collection of social media sites and services that serve as the foundation for their social media communications. But most have not realized that “join the conversation” does not mean “tell me about your products and services”. It means there is a current conversation in progress and you’re welcome to participate – just like in a synchronous real world conversation between different people. The same assumptions most would make from this situation on what is acceptable and what is not acceptable is all too often overlooked my marketing and sales professionals. Bad manners, blatant intrusions and inappropriate language are not acceptable in the classroom, or in a restaurant, or in a place of business and it surely is not acceptable in social media. “Content Marketing” utilizes various media to initiate, contribute and facilitate conversations about the subjects you and your audience are interested in discussing. This quid pro quo over time helps develop the brand and, more importantly, the customer relationship. Introducing Stylin Online In two years, Ideahaus has established the Stylin Online brand as “your pop culture department store” and a leader in the retail industry producing a daily web-based show, “I am stylin’ | Adventures in Pop Culture” featuring celebrity interviews, award show gift suites, comic conventions and fan experiences. Target The Audience The target audience for Stylin Online is the fans of pop culture. The men and women (18-55) who stand in line for tickets, never miss a show, and can recount line after line of their favorite episode or movie. Specific categories include comics, television, movies, sci-fi, horror, anime, cartoons, Disney, video games and music. This strategy was designed to target not only current Stylin Online fans, but also gain exposure with those un-aware of Stylin Online. Determine The Goals Our primary goal of our strategy was to create a viral-like multimedia marketing vehicle which would entertain both those aware and unaware of Stylin Online, to encourage sharing, and to move more product. Every video producer hopes their effort will become a million-view hit, but we were more pragmatic about the opportunity, especially over time. Our secondary goals had to align with our strengths and opportunities coming out of our SWOT analysis. We knew that one of Stylin Online’s strengths is their reputation on the convention circuit. Attending 20 shows each year since 1995 had established Stylin Online as a staple of conventions, and the expected relationships had followed. The social capital with convention organizers, celebrity media and other retailers with the brand equity built from satisfied veteran customers could be leveraged – but for what? Do The Research As with every campaign, research was an important aspect of the creation. We watched a lot of videos suggested by fans to develop a current “best practices” approach to viral production. We discussed concepts with media relation representatives from the shows we attended to pre-flight requests and suggestions we would pose to prospective partners (i.e., How could we help promote attendance at your show, and utilize the resources which are part of our participation?) We also discussed our approach to the celebrity media we had developed relationships with during award show and celebrity gift suites in Hollywood, CA. They shared what they liked about videos, fans and interviews as well as what they did not like. Collectively, it was a wealth of information. We found that our products were well regarded. Fan testimonials, celebrity feedback and media coverage demonstrated an interest in the brand and in the extensive product line (200,000 SKU). We also found we had access to an array of celebrities associated with many of the products in inventory, and that they would be willing to discuss their roles and responsibilities. Our experience with sharing celebrity pictures had been positive throughout the social media platform, and had progressed to video “shout-outs” with great reactions from their respective fans. Executing The Plan A pilot was developed during the Anaheim Comic Con, updated during the Motor City Comic Con, and fine-tuned for the San Diego Comic Con (the largest event of its type in the world). Our original distribution included the expected YouTube and Facebook: As popularity grew, so did the popularity of other video networks, like Veoh, Vimeo and MetaCafe. We identified an opportunity reduce our time to market with a distribution network, a single source that would distribute to multiple video sites. We branded “I am stylin’ | Adventures in Pop Culture” as a stand-alone media property, sponsored by StylinOnline. Stylin Online was a major staple on every episode, including branding, product placement, trial / implementation and content development. The distribution network was also increased to (35) sites services, blogs and social media including: • FacebookWeb SiteTwitterYouTube About The Results Following the debut of the San Diego Comic Con episodes the show was granted media credentials to every event. This increased the credibility of the show and provided additional access and information previously unavailable. Since the debut, we have produced over 180 episodes with an average length of 5 minutes. As expected, total views of each episode is a monitored metric, ranging from dozens to tens of thousands depending on the subject matter and the interview. The quantitative was usually an indicator on how well coupon codes presented inside each episode would be redeemed (10% off next order, free shipping, etc). Each episode includes a link to the online store, links to the show web site and product included in the episode. These links x the total number of distribution points has made a dramatic impact on the SEO (Search Engine Optimization) the client receives in Google, etc. The qualitative was also monitored – what did the fans have to say? These comments often turned into conversations between fans about the segment, as well as the product placed with (i.e., the t-shirt the host / celebrity was wearing). These conversations turned into conversations about the products & events and converted into sales. [private Professional|C-Level] Watch the Slidecast (PPT+MP3) This case study was presented at the MBA Conclave and Teaching Conference in San Diego, CA on June 21, 2011 by Ideahaus Communications Director Kevin Popovic. Click "play" to view the slides and listen to Kevin's presentation to the audience of educators.
 
Download this Presentation: Click here to download the PPT w/ speaker notes.
[/private] Learn More Want to learn more about this case study and content marketing? Do you have a story to share? Post your comments and questions here, or contacts us directly. [/ismember] [nonmember]

Sure you have a social media platform, but what are you and your fans going to talk about and how will it generate sales?

By now, most businesses have built a basic social media platform – a collection of social media sites and services that serve as the foundation for their social media communications. But most have not realized that “join the conversation” does not mean “tell me about your products and services”. It means there is a current conversation in progress and you’re welcome to participate – just like in a synchronous real world conversation between different people. The same assumptions most would make from this situation on what is acceptable and what is not acceptable is all too often overlooked my marketing and sales professionals. Bad manners, blatant intrusions and inappropriate language are not acceptable in the classroom, or in a restaurant, or in a place of business and it surely is not acceptable in social media. “Content Marketing” utilizes various media to initiate, contribute and facilitate conversations about the subjects you and your audience are interested in discussing. This quid pro quo over time helps develop the brand and, more importantly, the customer relationship. Introducing Stylin Online In two years, Ideahaus has established the Stylin Online brand as “your pop culture department store” and a leader in the retail industry producing a daily web-based show, “I am stylin’ | Adventures in Pop Culture” featuring celebrity interviews, award show gift suites, comic conventions and fan experiences...
The remainder of this article is available to members of the Ideahaus Professional Community. Sign up for the free Social Member level here.
[/nonmember]

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

About the Author ()

Kevin Popović is a communications expert, featured speaker, and author of '20YEARS Communications: 20 Leaders, 20 Questions, 100's of Lessons.' After more than 30 years of professional experience, he helps business leaders make smart decisions about communications. In 2010, "KP" was ranked #43 in Fast Company's The Influence Project measuring the "most influential people online." In 2014 he was ranked as one of the "Top 40 Digital Strategists in Marketing" by the Online Marketing Institute.

Comments (3)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Tom Stacey says:

    Broadcasting has been slowly morphing into narrow-casting, and you’ve just accelerated the trend. It makes perfect sense for a brand like Stylin to have their own show. What are some other brands that would fit this model? Automotive companies? Lifestyle brands?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *